The 2019 Nashville British Car Club Show

Fullscreen capture 10122019 15556 PM.bmpl haven’t done one of these in a while, maybe for a couple of reasons.  First, these shows are usually held at The Parthenon in Nashville, and in recent years, parking for the event has been moved to a distant and inconvenient location.  Second, driving in Nashville traffic, especially on the weekends, is now something l try to avoid at all costs.  Except for infrequently doing a radio show on Music Row, there is very little that can attract me to drive in Music City any more.

But this year, it’s my understanding that the grand Greek structure and area is undergoing some construction, so a new location was found.  And as it turned out, that spot was not far from my home.  So l fired up the Miata, drove some nice country roads over to Brentwood, and spent some time wandering about these classic and classy British motor cars. Continue reading

Framing John DeLorean, a review:

On October 19, 1982, John Z. DeLorean is arrested, charged with 8 felonies related to cocaine smuggling. Within this date, his company, DMC, shut down. He would eventually be acquitted and set free, due to the fact that it was basically entrapment. Well over 35+ years have passed since these events took place and it’s only now that we’re finally getting proper motion pictures of the man and what happened to him and his company.

Earlier this year, I caught wind of a John DeLorean documentary, but I didn’t follow up on it, given that I knew that type of film wouldn’t be shown in my local theaters. I just hoped I would be able to find it for rent online and not used as exclusive content with a relatively obscure streaming service (I still haven’t seen Charlie Sheen’s No Man’s Land because of this). On a boring Saturday night, while scrolling aimlessly through a certain Internet giant’s movie recommendations, I came across an overpriced rental with only a 24 hour watching period a 2019 John DeLorean film. It had to be the same one, right?

It wasn’t.

Who knew there were two John DeLorean motion pictures released in 2019? I’ve since taken care of watching both.

Framing John DeLorean is a documentary that delves into the man who created the company that produced the iconic DMC-12 sports car… and despite his efforts to keep it going, doomed it: John Zachary DeLorean. This former automotive giant’s story has been told before, usually as a summary to the DMC-12 or as just a punchline. Time has definitely been kind to him (and even more so to his car), but there’s so much to the man that it’s surprisingly hard to put him on film, which is what Alec Baldwin found out while researching the role for scene recreation.

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Driven (2019):

On October 19, 1982, John Z. DeLorean is arrested, charged with 8 felonies related to cocaine smuggling. Within this date, his company, DMC, shut down. He would eventually be acquitted and set free, due to the fact that it was basically entrapment. Well over 35+ years have passed since these events took place and it’s only now that we’re finally getting proper motion pictures of the man and what happened to him and his company.

Sleazebag Jim Hoffman (Jason Sudeikis) is on trial. It has nothing to do with getting caught earlier in his life with a plane-load of cocaine or tax evasion. He’s testifying against neighbor, in-a-way-business partner and friend-of-sorts John Z. DeLorean (Lee Pace). To think it all started because Jim’s car, a Pontiac GTO, which John once had a hand in developing, grabbed his attention while Jim worked on it…

John is a famous, successful and dashing man full of passion and conviction who believes that his new car company will succeed. While unable to be of any use financially for John’s DeLorean Motor Company startup, Jim managed to befriend him. He even gave John the suggestion to move his operations overseas to save some money. In time, Jim will open to John about his less-than-stellar past.

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Kia: 25 Years After

This post was originally titled Kia: 20 Years After when it was first published on September 11, 2014 on CarLustBlog.com, celebrating 20 years of Kia in the U.S.A. While most of the post remains the same, details of those 5 additional years are now included.

Probably the most truthful automotive slogan I’ve read.

Like Mitsubishi’s 30th 35th Anniversary and Scion’s 10th Anniversary, I was caught off-guard by Kia turning 20 25 in the U.S. market, hadn’t it been for a news snippet on the local classifieds. Truth be told, I wasn’t paying much attention. Kias weren’t my thing. But seeing how much the brand has grown in a slightly shorter period of time than its sister Hyundai, I believe it deserves merit to travel back in time to see where it all began, even if it’s just for the kitschy-ness of it all. So set the VCR to record the series finale of Star Trek: The Next Generation as well as the first episodes of Gargoyles, ReBoot and Street Sharks, to name a few; tie up those rollerblades or Air Jordan IX’s, put some fresh batteries on your Gameboy (don’t forget the Donkey Kong cartridge!) and Walkman (with Corona’s Rhythm of the Night), bring a pair of fresh underwear in your JanSport backpack, get the tickets for Forrest Gump, pay your respects to the late Ayrton Senna, forget about the canceled World Series and please keep your opinion on the OJ Simpson murder case to yourself,  because we’re going back… to 1994.

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The Mystery Machine

1969 was a very good year because it gave us very good things. Here’s one of ‘em: Scooby-Doo. To celebrate the 50th Anniversary of when it first aired back in September 13, 1969, I’ve brought back an early post close to my heart. Originally published on December 3, 2015 on CarLustBlog.com, it’s been edited (mostly formatting for better flow), expanded, did some hyperlink replacement, plus added a couple of new pics, but it’s still pretty much the same.

Author’s note: I’m going to focus on the Mystery Machine we all know and love. Even though I’ve watched a lot of Scooby-Doo over the years and because the Scooby universe is quite large, details will be missed. Not even as a kid could I have watched it all. And some of the stuff is just plain unwatchable! Update: I no longer watch Cartoon Network as often as I used to; I’m down to just watching one cartoon from ‘em. I gave up on the so-called home of Scooby-Doo, Boomerang -formerly CN’s vintage cartoons channel- ever since it got reworked for 2015. So I’m not up to par with their releases… if they’re promoted at all.

The Mystery Machine. The oftentimes unsung member of Mystery Inc. Thanks to this, well, machine (and the A-Team van), I believed, without a shadow of a doubt in my mind, that vannin’ was cool. The appeal of traveling around the country, no, the world in your custom van with your friends is just too appealing for a naïve, car-loving kid. Today, the Mystery Machine brings me memories of those days.

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